The Progressive Debate

The ugly truth is that you can be a progressive and be from nearly any point on the American political spectrum – see both Roosevelts, Truman, Ike, Earl Warren, etc.

Of course, if you accept the rhetorical construct promulgated by the far Left – that “progressive” is just a euphemism for “radical” in the way that the far Right uses “conservative” as a euphemism for “reactionary,” then this all falls apart.

In the name of truth and clarity, however, we must reject these political inexactitudes and name things for what they are.

Bernie Sanders is not a progressive. He is a radical. Hillary Clinton is a liberal.

Ted Cruz is not a conservative. He is a reactionary. John Kasich represents something far closer to a conservative. John Huntsman is a conservative with progressive leanings.

And Donald Trump is a power-hungry opportunist who takes on whatever political shadings he thinks will rouse the nearest rabble and get him one more delegate close to election.

We can argue definitions, but let us do so in the quest for accurate descriptions, not for the sake of political spin.

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Bull Moose Dictionary: Astroturf Politics

Astroturf Politics: an expression that refers to the deployment of monetary and/or media assets by an individual or small group in order to create the illusion of a grassroots sentiment or movement, or to create the illusion that a lunatic fringe actually represents mainstream sentiment.

Astroturf politics have been used by both liberals and conservatives. Traditional Democratic machine politics a la Tammany Hall were the earliest and crudest manifestation of the phenomenon. Most recently, Obama campaign strategist David Axelrod and Democratic-leaning billionaire George Soros have been accused of employing the tactic with liberal-left organizations like MoveOn.org and J-Street, and industrialists Charles and David Koch have been accused of doing the same in the effort to spawn and support libertarian and reactionary causes, including the Tea Party movement.