Conservatism’s Primary Duty

There is a huge failure of imagination on the right. And a failure of self-awareness.  It may also be that I don’t see conservatism’s primary duty as guarding the purity of certain 19th century liberal principles on economics. I see its task as reconciling and harmonizing the diverse energies and interests of a society for the common good.

Michael Brendan Dougherty

Source: A Hard Case, For Trump | The American Conservative

Dougherty, who contends that Donald Trump qua politico-ideological revolutionary is already disintegrating, makes a point that is particularly timely for me, given my ongoing efforts to frame a modern American political taxonomy (you know, when I’m not working, being a husband, a dad, a scout leader, promoting my book, or trying to shake off a persistent respiratory infection. In short, it’s coming, but not today.)

First, in saying this Dougherty taps into something elemental: what does it mean to be a conservative? And, thank G-d he’s doing it. We ALL should. What does it mean to be all of these things.

I don’t know if conservatism can claim a monopoly on “reconciling and harmonizing the diverse energies and interests of a society for the common good.” I’d wager every single candidate for the presidency would say that this is exactly what they are doing. But I would argue that it is better to claim that ground than claim as your ethos a commitment to placing orthodox economic globalism over the well-being of the nation.

As a starting point: conservatism’s primary duty should be reconciling and harmonizing the diverse energies and interests of American society for the common good, and doing so through thoughtful and measured progress.

Advertisements

Author: David Wolf

An adviser to corporations and organizations on strategy, communications, and public affairs, David Wolf has been working and living in Beijing since 1995, and now divides his time between China and California. He also serves as a policy and industry analyst focused on innovative and creative industries, a futurist, and an amateur historian.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s