Are the Koch Brothers the Real Problem?

Koch brothers’ Americans for Prosperity plans $125 million spending spree
Kenneth P. Vogel
POLITICO.com

We at the Bull Moose are no fans of the Koch brothers. The power they wield in the American political process is too disproportional to their individual votes for a thinking conservative to tolerate.

But rather than believe that they are the problem, we must understand that they, George Soros, the AFL-CIO, and the President’s friends in Hollywood are all visible symptoms of the real disease afflicting the American polity – a political system that requires candidates to raise vast amounts of money just to have a decent chance of winning.

The problem is Moneyball Politics. Put an end to the need for monstrous sums of money to fuel political campaigns, and you take a large step toward making individual votes matter again.

Advertisements

Author: David Wolf

An adviser to corporations and organizations on strategy, communications, and public affairs, David Wolf has been working and living in Beijing since 1995, and now divides his time between China and California. He also serves as a policy and industry analyst focused on innovative and creative industries, a futurist, and an amateur historian.

2 thoughts on “Are the Koch Brothers the Real Problem?”

  1. *A* problem is Moneyball politics, certainly. It’s an issue that most other democracies have taken action on, too, which leaves the US in the uncomfortable position of trailing well behind global best practice on an entirely fixable problem.

    But Moneyball politcs isn’t the problem with the Kochs. The problem is the Kochs championing of junk science, and pouring their not inconsiderable resources into not only delaying action on climate change, but indelibly polluting the dialogue on that extremely important — every blue-ribbon science grouping in the world calls it the most important — issue facing our entire civilisation.

    So let’s not try and create a false equivalence, or fall prey to the “I know you are but what am I?!” school of political commentary, eh?

  2. No, Shannon, you are incorrect. The problem is that the system grants people like the Kochs influence on the resolution of issues that is outside of the political system, the ability to influence policy and legislations behind closed doors. And “false equivalence?” Please. You are too new to our shores to remember the vice-grip hold that the AFL-CIO had on the Democratic Party until Bill Clinton yanked the Dems to the Center; but you are certainly aware enough that any balanced read of what George Soros is engaged in is every bit as repugnant as what the Kochs are doing. The only difference is that you happen to agree with what Soros is doing, so you give him a pass. I agree with some of what the Kochs stand for, but I condemn them because I recognize that the process cannot be divorced from the outcome. The ends do not justify the means.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s