Forgiveness

In the name of national unity, after a war that killed more Americans than any before or since, Abraham Lincoln called for a national reconciliation with millions of his fellow Americans who not only disagreed with him, but hated him with an unmitigated passion: “With malice toward none, and charity for all…”

If Lincoln could utter those words after a disagreement that wrought unspeakable bloodshed, why is it not possible for so many of those who fought passionately for the legalization of same-sex marriage to do the same for their foes?

This nation was founded upon the concept of “E pluribus unum,” out of many, a single united entity. That did not mean that we stopped being “many,” or different. That did not mean assimilation. It meant that we came together and remained so in spite of our differences.

E pluribus unum remains the watchword of the nation. It must be the watchword of us all, or we will cease being a nation.

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Author: David Wolf

An adviser to corporations and organizations on strategy, communications, and public affairs, David Wolf has been working and living in Beijing since 1995, and now divides his time between China and California. He also serves as a policy and industry analyst focused on innovative and creative industries, a futurist, and an amateur historian.

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