Hung Up on Size

In a thoughtful Wall Street Journal editorial, Michael Barone condemns as misguided what he perceives liberal nostalgia for World War II, an era where big government accomplished historic things and Keynesian spending yanked the nation out of the Depression. He takes liberals to task for failing to realize that “Big Government, Big Business, and Big Labor” turn ordinary people into faceless cogs in a very large machine.

Barone is not wrong. Any large institution tends to eat away at individualism, and the larger governments, corporations, and unions get, the more the welfare of the individual is subsumed by the need to attend the flock. (To his list of “Bigs” I would add Big Education, Big Science, and even Big Church.)

Ironically, Barone misses a point. Faced with a global onslaught of facism, itself the total mobilization of government, industry, labor, education and science in an effort to conquer the globe, the centralization of political, industrial, and labor institutions was the only logical response. Big government, in that case, was the appropriate response.

Where Barone and other libertarian conservatives are correct is in contending that big government is not the appropriate solution to every vexing issue. Where they are wrong is in their fearful orthodoxy that implies that the only good institution is a tiny one – or a dead one – regardless of circumstance.

We need measures of institutional virtue that rise above the crypto-Freudian obsession with size, that adjudge effectiveness, efficiency, relevance, and costs in a more thoughtful way than simply watching budgets and counting noses.

American history proves that big government can be great, and it can be awful; that big labor can be a force for progress and human dignity at some times, and at others it can suck the lifeblood out of an industry or an economy; and that big business can be the engine of prosperity for the many, or a source of enrichment and empowerment for an aristocracy of merchants and financiers.

Our quest must be to seek the point of balance and to constantly evaluate how it is shifting. Using a simple measure like size is, to borrow from H.L. Mencken, simple, workable, and wrong. Such thinking makes for great sound bytes, but the tools of demagogues too rarely craft good policy.

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Author: David Wolf

An adviser to corporations and organizations on strategy, communications, and public affairs, David Wolf has been working and living in Beijing since 1995, and now divides his time between China and California. He also serves as a policy and industry analyst focused on innovative and creative industries, a futurist, and an amateur historian.

2 thoughts on “Hung Up on Size”

  1. Size is perhaps analogous to technology. Use appropriate technology as appropriate. Small isn’t always beautiful, nor is big.

    1. There is something slightly obsessive-compulsive in the American psyche that leads us to conclude that if a little of a good thing is good, a lot is great. My son feels that way about candy, french fries, television, and his XboX. This leads me to believe that a sign of intellectual maturity is getting over a focus on quantity.

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